Posts tagged transport

Google patent details ad-powered free transport service

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Self-driving vehicles could offer free rides sponsored by advertisers.

Electric bus routes launch in the UK.
Eight electric buses will run in Milton Keynes starting later this month, as part of a five year trial to see if the vehicles can match the performance of diesels.
The bus batteries will be charged at the start and end of a 15 mile route using underground induction coils to provide inductive charging to receiving plates underneath the bus. By charging the buses regularly at each end of the route, the buses will be less dependent on bulky onboard energy storage, allowing for less batteries and more passenger space.

Electric bus routes launch in the UK.

Eight electric buses will run in Milton Keynes starting later this month, as part of a five year trial to see if the vehicles can match the performance of diesels.

The bus batteries will be charged at the start and end of a 15 mile route using underground induction coils to provide inductive charging to receiving plates underneath the bus. By charging the buses regularly at each end of the route, the buses will be less dependent on bulky onboard energy storage, allowing for less batteries and more passenger space.

Hyperloop design released.
Check out the ‘Hylerloop Alpha’ design here at Tesla Motors blog.

Hyperloop design released.

Check out the ‘Hylerloop Alpha’ design here at Tesla Motors blog.

Electric road charges buses on the go.
South Korea has deployed a system to charge electric buses as they drive over the road, using electric cables under the road to create electromagnetic fields.  A receiving coil under the bus is able to charge the battery in the bus, with a gap of about 6.5 inches (16 cm) under the bus.

The power doesn’t need to be constantly supplied, either; the cables only run underneath 5 to 15 percent of the road, which means less roadwork involved in installation — and they can detect when a compatible vehicle is overhead, only switching on when one of the OLEV buses is passing by, making it safer for other drivers and pedestrians. That said, the technology does comply with international electromagnetic field safety standards.

Electric road charges buses on the go.

South Korea has deployed a system to charge electric buses as they drive over the road, using electric cables under the road to create electromagnetic fields.  A receiving coil under the bus is able to charge the battery in the bus, with a gap of about 6.5 inches (16 cm) under the bus.

The power doesn’t need to be constantly supplied, either; the cables only run underneath 5 to 15 percent of the road, which means less roadwork involved in installation — and they can detect when a compatible vehicle is overhead, only switching on when one of the OLEV buses is passing by, making it safer for other drivers and pedestrians. That said, the technology does comply with international electromagnetic field safety standards.

Video: Evacuated Tube Transport.

An evacuated tube transport system has been proposed, which would allow six-person capsules to travel at speeds of up to 6,500km/h (4,040mph)with forces of only 1G.

Those speeds would take you from Los Angeles to New York in 45 minutes, or New York to China in two hours.

The system works using magnetic ‘levitation’ to glide the 1.5 meter diameter tubes along. Because the system is inside a vacuum tube, there is no resistance for the capsule, so after an initial energy boost to get it moving, it would (in theory) just coast along at the same speed, thanks to Newtons first law.

Small car folds up to 149cm.
The Hiriko electric car is meant for small trips around an urban city, with its maximum speed of 59mph powered by four electric motors.
The car folds up at the press of a button to become only 149cm/59” long. That’s half the space a normal compact car needs. With no side doors on the car, the driver gets in and out the front, with the entire windscreen able to lift up.
When the car hits the market in 2013, it is expected to cost only US$16,500.

Small car folds up to 149cm.

The Hiriko electric car is meant for small trips around an urban city, with its maximum speed of 59mph powered by four electric motors.

The car folds up at the press of a button to become only 149cm/59” long. That’s half the space a normal compact car needs. With no side doors on the car, the driver gets in and out the front, with the entire windscreen able to lift up.

When the car hits the market in 2013, it is expected to cost only US$16,500.