Posts tagged space

Mt Etna and Stromboli erupting the same day, from the ISS.
Taken by Alexander Gerst, check out @Astro_Alex for more.

Mt Etna and Stromboli erupting the same day, from the ISS.

Taken by Alexander Gerst, check out @Astro_Alex for more.

#SpaceVine timelapse, #Italy #lightning and a speechless @NASA astronaut.

Photos: Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko.

The European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft successfully rendezvoused with Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko this week, at a distance of 555 million kilometers from the Sun.

From the New York Times:

Over the coming months, Rosetta and its comet, called C-G for short, will plunge together toward the sun.

In November, a small 220-pound lander is to leave the spacecraft, set down on the comet and harpoon itself to the surface, the first time a spacecraft will gently land on a comet.

Payload announced for NASA’s Mars 2020 rover

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NASA has announced the seven instruments which were chosen out of a pool of 58 proposals to be included on NASA’s next Mars rover.

Lunar transit, captured from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory.
On July 26, 2014, the moon crossed between NASA’s SDO and the sun, a phenomenon called a lunar transit. This happens approximately twice a year, causing a partial solar eclipse that can only be seen from SDO’s point of view. Images of the eclipse show a crisp lunar horizon, because the moon has no atmosphere that would distort light.

By blending different SDO wavelengths, we can get an enhanced image of the sun. The left image was taken in 304 wavelength, the middle in 171 wavelength, and the right shows the blended result.

Lunar transit, captured from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory.

On July 26, 2014, the moon crossed between NASA’s SDO and the sun, a phenomenon called a lunar transit. This happens approximately twice a year, causing a partial solar eclipse that can only be seen from SDO’s point of view. Images of the eclipse show a crisp lunar horizon, because the moon has no atmosphere that would distort light.

By blending different SDO wavelengths, we can get an enhanced image of the sun. The left image was taken in 304 wavelength, the middle in 171 wavelength, and the right shows the blended result.

Photo: Apollo 17 landing site, from space.
At the Apollo 17 site, the tracks laid down by the lunar rover are clearly visible, along with the last foot trails left on the moon. The image also shows where the astronauts placed some of the scientific instruments that provided the first insight into the moon’s environment and interior.
The image was taken by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter during a low orbit of the Moon at nearly 13 miles (21 kilometers) above the surface.
Larger image here.

Photo: Apollo 17 landing site, from space.

At the Apollo 17 site, the tracks laid down by the lunar rover are clearly visible, along with the last foot trails left on the moon. The image also shows where the astronauts placed some of the scientific instruments that provided the first insight into the moon’s environment and interior.

The image was taken by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter during a low orbit of the Moon at nearly 13 miles (21 kilometers) above the surface.

Larger image here.

Russian gecko sex experiment lost in space.
Well the internet seems to love this story and it does have a pretty funny headline.
A Russian research satellite carrying (among other things) five geckos has stopped responding to ground commands to start its engine to get back into a higher orbit. While life-support systems are thought to still be operating normally on the satellite, unless communication is reestablished with the satellite, it could burn up in Earth’s atmosphere within three to four months time. The geckos will likely have run out of food in around two and a half months.
The experiment was designed to test the effect of weightlessness on geckos sex lives, for some reason.
If communication is regained with the satellite it will be collected and returned to Earth in two months to further study the geckos.
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Russian gecko sex experiment lost in space.

Well the internet seems to love this story and it does have a pretty funny headline.

A Russian research satellite carrying (among other things) five geckos has stopped responding to ground commands to start its engine to get back into a higher orbit. While life-support systems are thought to still be operating normally on the satellite, unless communication is reestablished with the satellite, it could burn up in Earth’s atmosphere within three to four months time. The geckos will likely have run out of food in around two and a half months.

The experiment was designed to test the effect of weightlessness on geckos sex lives, for some reason.

If communication is regained with the satellite it will be collected and returned to Earth in two months to further study the geckos.

Most popular posts this week

Here’s what’s been popular on 8 Bit Future this week, based on likes, shares, and reblogs. Happy weekend reading!

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Pac-Man Graffiti. See full photo.

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The R-Kaid-R - an arcade machine in a box. See full post.

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Google and Novartis announced more plans for Google’s smart contact lens. See full post.

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Major console prices at today’s prices (inflation adjusted). See full picture.

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Caribbean Sea Viewed From the International Space Station. See full picture.

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The NES30 bluetooth controller. See full picture.

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The Moon, Venus, and Pleiades. See full picture.

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Sonic the Hedgehog birthday Cake. See full picture.

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300 famous characters, in 8-bit. See full picture.

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Earth, from the ISS. See full picture.

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Sonic the indecisive hedgehog. See full picture.

As always you should check out www.8bitfuture.com for more photos, stories and videos related to anything tech, science, space or gaming!

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This is the sunshield on NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope.
This test unit was unfurled to full-size for the first time last week and “worked perfectly”, according to NASA.

The Sunshield is about the length of a tennis court, and will be folded up like an umbrella around the Webb telescope’s mirrors and instruments during launch. Once it reaches its orbit, the Webb telescope will receive a command from Earth to unfold, and separate the Sunshield’s five layers into their precisely stacked arrangement with its kite-like shape.
The Sunshield test unit was stacked and expanded at a cleanroom in the Northrop Grumman facility in Redondo Beach, California.
The Sunshield separates the observatory into a warm sun-facing side and a cold side where the sunshine is blocked from interfering with the sensitive infrared instruments. The infrared instruments need to be kept very cold (under 50 K or -370 degrees F) to operate.   The Sunshield protects these sensitive instruments with an effective sun protection factor or SPF of 1,000,000 (suntan lotion generally has an SPF of 8-50).

In addition to providing a cold environment, the Sunshield provides a thermally stable environment. This stability is essential to maintaining proper alignment of the primary mirror segments as the telescope changes its orientation to the sun.

This is the sunshield on NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope.

This test unit was unfurled to full-size for the first time last week and “worked perfectly”, according to NASA.

The Sunshield is about the length of a tennis court, and will be folded up like an umbrella around the Webb telescope’s mirrors and instruments during launch. Once it reaches its orbit, the Webb telescope will receive a command from Earth to unfold, and separate the Sunshield’s five layers into their precisely stacked arrangement with its kite-like shape.

The Sunshield test unit was stacked and expanded at a cleanroom in the Northrop Grumman facility in Redondo Beach, California.

The Sunshield separates the observatory into a warm sun-facing side and a cold side where the sunshine is blocked from interfering with the sensitive infrared instruments. The infrared instruments need to be kept very cold (under 50 K or -370 degrees F) to operate.   The Sunshield protects these sensitive instruments with an effective sun protection factor or SPF of 1,000,000 (suntan lotion generally has an SPF of 8-50).

In addition to providing a cold environment, the Sunshield provides a thermally stable environment. This stability is essential to maintaining proper alignment of the primary mirror segments as the telescope changes its orientation to the sun.