Posts tagged space

Video: NASA test firing of their new 3D printed rocket.

NASA was able to reduce the number of components in this rocket’s injector from 163, down to just two, by using a printing technology called “selective laser melting”.

Tropical storm Marie, from the ISS.
Taken by Alexander Gerst.

Tropical storm Marie, from the ISS.

Taken by Alexander Gerst.

8 Bit Future’s back (from the future?)
A few issues with 8bitfuture.com over the last couple of weeks have been resolved. My hosting provider completely disappeared, taking 6,000 websites with it by the look of things on their Facebook page, so the domain is now handled through GoDaddy which should be a bit more reliable, if not more expensive, but a good lesson that when it comes to the internet, you get what you pay for.
The image above is from a 2010 proposal to send ‘tumbleweed probes’ to Mars, where they could be moved around by wind instead of driving on six wheels like the currently active NASA rovers there. Video of the rovers here.
Another interesting space story this week is about the state of Curiosity’s wheels, which are currently developing large holes that could put the extended mission in jeopardy. The short version is that NASA didn’t realise just what kind of rocks they’d be dealing with, but the rover could continue indefinitely if they take it to more soft sandy areas. Below is a photo of a replica wheel, tested to breaking point here on Earth. Interesting to see it with a human - I never realised how big the rover was until seeing one of it’s wheels! Check out the full story here at Gizmodo.

8 Bit Future’s back (from the future?)

A few issues with 8bitfuture.com over the last couple of weeks have been resolved. My hosting provider completely disappeared, taking 6,000 websites with it by the look of things on their Facebook page, so the domain is now handled through GoDaddy which should be a bit more reliable, if not more expensive, but a good lesson that when it comes to the internet, you get what you pay for.

The image above is from a 2010 proposal to send ‘tumbleweed probes’ to Mars, where they could be moved around by wind instead of driving on six wheels like the currently active NASA rovers there. Video of the rovers here.

Another interesting space story this week is about the state of Curiosity’s wheels, which are currently developing large holes that could put the extended mission in jeopardy. The short version is that NASA didn’t realise just what kind of rocks they’d be dealing with, but the rover could continue indefinitely if they take it to more soft sandy areas. Below is a photo of a replica wheel, tested to breaking point here on Earth. Interesting to see it with a human - I never realised how big the rover was until seeing one of it’s wheels! Check out the full story here at Gizmodo.

Video: NASA’s ‘flying saucer’ tested in the upper atmosphere.

NASA is testing a “flying saucer” designed to land on Mars and deliver large payloads to the Red Planet, and the agency has released a spectacular video of a high-altitude test conducted over Hawaii this past June. In it, the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) is brought up 180,000 feet high into earth’s atmosphere, a place where conditions are similar to those on Mars. After confirming that the vehicle could fly in these conditions, NASA then tried to slow the craft down with two new technologies — a funky, donut-shaped “Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator” and a massive supersonic parachute.

Mt Etna and Stromboli erupting the same day, from the ISS.
Taken by Alexander Gerst, check out @Astro_Alex for more.

Mt Etna and Stromboli erupting the same day, from the ISS.

Taken by Alexander Gerst, check out @Astro_Alex for more.

#SpaceVine timelapse, #Italy #lightning and a speechless @NASA astronaut.

Photos: Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko.

The European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft successfully rendezvoused with Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko this week, at a distance of 555 million kilometers from the Sun.

From the New York Times:

Over the coming months, Rosetta and its comet, called C-G for short, will plunge together toward the sun.

In November, a small 220-pound lander is to leave the spacecraft, set down on the comet and harpoon itself to the surface, the first time a spacecraft will gently land on a comet.

Payload announced for NASA’s Mars 2020 rover

image

NASA has announced the seven instruments which were chosen out of a pool of 58 proposals to be included on NASA’s next Mars rover.