Posts tagged robots

Video: Graffiti drone.

This creation by graffiti artist KATSU is currently operated by remote control, but with plans to make the design open source, I wonder how long it will be before someone figures out a way to have it operating autonomously.

Video: Robot strippers.

CUPID drone features an 80,000 volt stun gun.
Tech company Chaotic Moon have shown their smartphone-controlled drone called CUPID, able to detain a subject by using an 80,000 volt stun gun.
The power output is so strong, it creates an electromagnetic field large enough to ruin any electronics within a five foot range. The electronics in the drone itself are shielded in a Faraday cage.
There’s a video up here of the drone ‘detaining’ an intern.

CUPID drone features an 80,000 volt stun gun.

Tech company Chaotic Moon have shown their smartphone-controlled drone called CUPID, able to detain a subject by using an 80,000 volt stun gun.

The power output is so strong, it creates an electromagnetic field large enough to ruin any electronics within a five foot range. The electronics in the drone itself are shielded in a Faraday cage.

There’s a video up here of the drone ‘detaining’ an intern.

Video: Toro-Bots.

These robotic garden lamps are connected via a central wireless hub, which can also be accessed via iPad to monitor or change their behaviour.

These little garden ‘bots are meant to meander about your topiaries and flower pots, altering the overall aesthetic of your garden every time you lift your head. Even better, each of the Toro-bots has its own encoded “personality”. With a series of infrared rangefinders, the robots can sense their surroundings, even reacting to human visitors to their garden by stepping out of your way.

Video: ‘Paintball Picasso’.

Using three paintball guns mounted on a 3D printed pan/tilt servo bracket, Waterloo Labs creation is able to shoot o ut 10 paintballs per second to create any shape entered by the user. Or the software can trace an outline of a person or shape standing in front of the camera and shoot around the edge.

Video: Dancing Spider-Bot.

Robugtix’s T8 spider robot is going up for sale soon for US$499. Not sure what you’d use it for except scaring co-workers though - and you’d be risking someone stomping on your new $500 bot - but here’s the pre-order page.

Video: Unbounded Robotics UBR-1 robot.

The UBR-1 is a US$35,000 was developed to be able to be used right out of the box, with no complicated programming required. 

It can roll around, extend its height to be between three and four feet tall, pick up objects and take in human speech. Its eyes are sensors developed by the company that made sensors for the Kinect, and it is constantly taking in visual information so it can interact with its surroundings.

UBR-1 is also very safe to be around. If you’re in a factory and an industrial robot swings its arm and hits you, you’re dead. UBR-1 can see you. But if it does hit you, it is more like being hit by a Roomba. It doesn’t hurt, and you can easily overpower the robot to reposition its arm.

Unbounded Robotics was founded in January by former employees of robot-maker Willow Garage - the company behind the PR2. The new company is optimistic about the future of personal robots in homes:

“In three short years … we’ve been able to cost reduce (the PR2) robot by 10x,” Wise said. “I’m not saying it’s going to be a linear curve, … but I think that it means that we have a path to getting robots in our home that are very capable. For a long time now, the hardware physically has been capable of doing certain tasks. But the software is where the really big hurdles live.”

Qualcomm shows off neural processing units

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The US semiconductor company has shown off their new generation of neural processing units (NPU’s) which are modelled on the human brain. The new generation of chips and design tools will be available to developers next year and the company thinks they will lead to some pretty exciting new products.

Video: Autonomous robots search and destroy jellyfish.

The JAROS bots are a floating platform equipped with a camera system able to locate jellyfish, before moving in and shredding them in its propeller.

The design ensures only jellyfish (and perhaps very small fish!) can be drawn into the propeller. JAROS are able to communicate with each other to allow them to move in formation. 

Aside from posing a danger to swimmers, jellyfish accidents and fishing losses are adding up to over 300 billion won per year, or roughly 27 billion dollars, according to Koreas Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, who developed the bots.

jellyfish shredder