Posts tagged navy

Navy announces timeline for ship-based lasers.
After successfully demonstrating a ship-based laser system last year, the Navy has announced it is almost ready to begin signing up contractors to build and install the system on their ships. (Cool video of the demonstration here)
The Office of Naval Research expects to have a working cannon ready to be installed on a ship within four years. The laser will target “Subsonic cruise missiles, aircraft, fast-moving boats, unmanned aerial vehicles”.

Navy announces timeline for ship-based lasers.

After successfully demonstrating a ship-based laser system last year, the Navy has announced it is almost ready to begin signing up contractors to build and install the system on their ships. (Cool video of the demonstration here)

The Office of Naval Research expects to have a working cannon ready to be installed on a ship within four years. The laser will target “Subsonic cruise missiles, aircraft, fast-moving boats, unmanned aerial vehicles”.

Navy releases video of it’s first railgun in action.
The prototype weapon was delivered to the Navy at the end of January, with a video of its first test shot being released this week.

This prototype weapon, developed by BAE Systems, fires inert aluminum slugs out of a 40-foot barrel using nothing but megajoules of raw electricity. The giant gout of flame you see in the picture above comes from a combination of about a million amps of energy, the hypersonic speed of the round, and the aluminum in the bullet reacting with the atmosphere. The ultimate goal here is to fire 10 rounds per minute with 32 megajoules of energy each, sending them between 50 and 100 miles downrange with flawless GPS-guided accuracy, at a speed that’s so high that when the rounds hit their target, they’ll be carrying the equivalent amount of destructive force as a Volkswagen Beetle traveling at 100 mph.
32 times over.

Check out the video of the shot, here.

Navy releases video of it’s first railgun in action.

The prototype weapon was delivered to the Navy at the end of January, with a video of its first test shot being released this week.

This prototype weapon, developed by BAE Systems, fires inert aluminum slugs out of a 40-foot barrel using nothing but megajoules of raw electricity. The giant gout of flame you see in the picture above comes from a combination of about a million amps of energy, the hypersonic speed of the round, and the aluminum in the bullet reacting with the atmosphere. The ultimate goal here is to fire 10 rounds per minute with 32 megajoules of energy each, sending them between 50 and 100 miles downrange with flawless GPS-guided accuracy, at a speed that’s so high that when the rounds hit their target, they’ll be carrying the equivalent amount of destructive force as a Volkswagen Beetle traveling at 100 mph.

32 times over.

Check out the video of the shot, here.

Navy invests $10 million in next generation weapons.
Naval Sea Systems Command has awarded Raytheon a $10 million contract to develop a Pulse Forming Network (PFN), which will power future weapons such as railguns, lasers, and advanced radar systems. The PFN is a power storage system, capable of delivering large amounts of power at once in the form of an electrical pulse.
The main focus for the PFN at this stage is to build a powerful railgun, which will use electromagnetism to enable projectiles to reach great distances without the use of an explosive charge or rocket motor. The projectile will travel up to 220 miles in less than six minutes and exit the atmosphere before hitting its target at a velocity of 5,000 feet per second.

"This new system will dramatically change how our Navy defends itself and engages enemies while at sea,” said Joe Biondi, vice president of Advanced Technology for Raytheon's Integrated Defense Systems business. “We have the expertise to design and build a solution that provides our warfighters with a decisive advantage over a multitude of current and emerging threats.”

Navy invests $10 million in next generation weapons.

Naval Sea Systems Command has awarded Raytheon a $10 million contract to develop a Pulse Forming Network (PFN), which will power future weapons such as railguns, lasers, and advanced radar systems. The PFN is a power storage system, capable of delivering large amounts of power at once in the form of an electrical pulse.

The main focus for the PFN at this stage is to build a powerful railgun, which will use electromagnetism to enable projectiles to reach great distances without the use of an explosive charge or rocket motor. The projectile will travel up to 220 miles in less than six minutes and exit the atmosphere before hitting its target at a velocity of 5,000 feet per second.

"This new system will dramatically change how our Navy defends itself and engages enemies while at sea,” said Joe Biondi, vice president of Advanced Technology for Raytheon's Integrated Defense Systems business. “We have the expertise to design and build a solution that provides our warfighters with a decisive advantage over a multitude of current and emerging threats.”