Posts tagged moon

Lunar transit, captured from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory.
On July 26, 2014, the moon crossed between NASA’s SDO and the sun, a phenomenon called a lunar transit. This happens approximately twice a year, causing a partial solar eclipse that can only be seen from SDO’s point of view. Images of the eclipse show a crisp lunar horizon, because the moon has no atmosphere that would distort light.

By blending different SDO wavelengths, we can get an enhanced image of the sun. The left image was taken in 304 wavelength, the middle in 171 wavelength, and the right shows the blended result.

Lunar transit, captured from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory.

On July 26, 2014, the moon crossed between NASA’s SDO and the sun, a phenomenon called a lunar transit. This happens approximately twice a year, causing a partial solar eclipse that can only be seen from SDO’s point of view. Images of the eclipse show a crisp lunar horizon, because the moon has no atmosphere that would distort light.

By blending different SDO wavelengths, we can get an enhanced image of the sun. The left image was taken in 304 wavelength, the middle in 171 wavelength, and the right shows the blended result.

Photo: Apollo 17 landing site, from space.
At the Apollo 17 site, the tracks laid down by the lunar rover are clearly visible, along with the last foot trails left on the moon. The image also shows where the astronauts placed some of the scientific instruments that provided the first insight into the moon’s environment and interior.
The image was taken by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter during a low orbit of the Moon at nearly 13 miles (21 kilometers) above the surface.
Larger image here.

Photo: Apollo 17 landing site, from space.

At the Apollo 17 site, the tracks laid down by the lunar rover are clearly visible, along with the last foot trails left on the moon. The image also shows where the astronauts placed some of the scientific instruments that provided the first insight into the moon’s environment and interior.

The image was taken by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter during a low orbit of the Moon at nearly 13 miles (21 kilometers) above the surface.

Larger image here.

Photo: The Moon, Venus, and Pleiades.
Taken over Arizona by B.G. Boyd, June 24 2014.
Pleiades star cluster is also known as the “seven sisters”:

Comprising 800 stars, the cluster formed about 100 million years ago and is located 410 light-years from Earth in the constellation Taurus. One light-year is the distance light travels in a single year, which is about 6 trillion miles (10 trillion kilometers).

Photo: The Moon, Venus, and Pleiades.

Taken over Arizona by B.G. Boyd, June 24 2014.

Pleiades star cluster is also known as the “seven sisters”:

Comprising 800 stars, the cluster formed about 100 million years ago and is located 410 light-years from Earth in the constellation Taurus. One light-year is the distance light travels in a single year, which is about 6 trillion miles (10 trillion kilometers).

NASA: Lunar pits could one day shelter astronauts.

While the moon’s surface is battered by millions of craters, it also has over 200 holes – steep-walled pits that in some cases might lead to caves that future astronauts could explore and use for shelter, according to new observations from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft.

The pits range in size from about 5 meters (~5 yards) across to more than 900 meters (~984 yards) in diameter, and three of them were first identified using images from the Japanese Kaguya spacecraft. Hundreds more were found using a new computer algorithm that automatically scanned thousands of high-resolution images of the lunar surface from LRO’s Narrow Angle Camera (NAC).

"Pits would be useful in a support role for human activity on the lunar surface," said Robert Wagner of Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona. "A habitat placed in a pit — ideally several dozen meters back under an overhang — would provide a very safe location for astronauts: no radiation, no micrometeorites, possibly very little dust, and no wild day-night temperature swings." 

Perigee moon rising over Lower Manhattan.
Photo by Debashis Pradhan - full sized photo.

Perigee moon rising over Lower Manhattan.

Photo by Debashis Pradhan - full sized photo.

Photo: Antares rocket and “super moon”.
Three of these perigee Moons will be seen this season, when the Moon and Earth are at their closest point in orbit, making it appear larger and brighter than normal. Look for others in August and September.
Meanwhile the Antares rocket pictured here successfully launched and is on its way to docking with the International Space Station on July 16.
Full sized photo from NASA.

Photo: Antares rocket and “super moon”.

Three of these perigee Moons will be seen this season, when the Moon and Earth are at their closest point in orbit, making it appear larger and brighter than normal. Look for others in August and September.

Meanwhile the Antares rocket pictured here successfully launched and is on its way to docking with the International Space Station on July 16.

Full sized photo from NASA.

A passenger plane pictured on approach to Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris, by Sebastien Lebrigand.

A passenger plane pictured on approach to Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris, by Sebastien Lebrigand.


NASA Releases First Interactive Mosaic of Lunar North Pole.






Scientists, using cameras aboard NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), have created the largest high resolution mosaic of our moon’s north polar region. The six-and-a-half feet (two-meters)-per-pixel images cover an area equal to more than one-quarter of the United States.
The images making up the mosaic were taken by the two LRO Narrow Angle Cameras, which are part of the instrument suite known as the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC). The cameras can record a tremendous dynamic range of lit and shadowed areas.
Web viewers can zoom in and out, and pan around an area. Constructed from 10,581 pictures, the mosaic provides enough detail to see textures and subtle shading of the lunar terrain. Consistent lighting throughout the images makes it easy to compare different regions.
To view the image with zoom and pan capability, visit: http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/gigapan.
NASA Releases First Interactive Mosaic of Lunar North Pole.

Scientists, using cameras aboard NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), have created the largest high resolution mosaic of our moon’s north polar region. The six-and-a-half feet (two-meters)-per-pixel images cover an area equal to more than one-quarter of the United States.

The images making up the mosaic were taken by the two LRO Narrow Angle Cameras, which are part of the instrument suite known as the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC). The cameras can record a tremendous dynamic range of lit and shadowed areas.

Web viewers can zoom in and out, and pan around an area. Constructed from 10,581 pictures, the mosaic provides enough detail to see textures and subtle shading of the lunar terrain. Consistent lighting throughout the images makes it easy to compare different regions.

To view the image with zoom and pan capability, visit: http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/gigapan.