Posts tagged mobile phones

Samsung hopes for 2020 launch of 5G.
Despite 4G technology still only just reaching many consumers, Samsung have been working on the next generation of mobile data transmission, claiming speeds of up to 1.056 Gbps. By comparison, real world tests on speeds of 4G networks in the US hardly got above 10 Mbps, or 0.01 Gbps.

Samsung said it plans to accelerate the research and development of 5G technologies, including adaptive array transceiver at the millimeter-wave bands, to commercialize those technologies by 2020. 

Samsung hopes for 2020 launch of 5G.

Despite 4G technology still only just reaching many consumers, Samsung have been working on the next generation of mobile data transmission, claiming speeds of up to 1.056 Gbps. By comparison, real world tests on speeds of 4G networks in the US hardly got above 10 Mbps, or 0.01 Gbps.

Samsung said it plans to accelerate the research and development of 5G technologies, including adaptive array transceiver at the millimeter-wave bands, to commercialize those technologies by 2020. 

'Yota' Smartphone uses second e-Paper display on back.
 The 4.3 inch Android phone features a grayscale e-Paper display on the back, able to show any information or image from the main front screen. By swiping down on the main screen with two fingers, a screen shot is transferred to the back display. This could allow a map to be stored easily to be re-checked later, for example.
Apps can also be developed to send information to the screen, allowing uses such as an eReader, an always-present alert system or a post-it note. A small touch sensitive area next to the e-Paper screen allows users to flip between pages of a book or interact with apps which use the second screen.
e-Paper displays only use power when they change, so it shouldn’t be a huge battery drain. The phone runs Android 4.1, has a dual-core Snapdragon CPU, 2GB of RAM and 16 or 32GB of internal storage. The company is looking for carrier partners in the US, but may still launch under it’s own brand there in the future.

'Yota' Smartphone uses second e-Paper display on back.

 The 4.3 inch Android phone features a grayscale e-Paper display on the back, able to show any information or image from the main front screen. By swiping down on the main screen with two fingers, a screen shot is transferred to the back display. This could allow a map to be stored easily to be re-checked later, for example.

Apps can also be developed to send information to the screen, allowing uses such as an eReader, an always-present alert system or a post-it note. A small touch sensitive area next to the e-Paper screen allows users to flip between pages of a book or interact with apps which use the second screen.

e-Paper displays only use power when they change, so it shouldn’t be a huge battery drain. The phone runs Android 4.1, has a dual-core Snapdragon CPU, 2GB of RAM and 16 or 32GB of internal storage. The company is looking for carrier partners in the US, but may still launch under it’s own brand there in the future.

First flexible smartphones to launch in 2013.
According to a report by the Wall Street Journal, Samsung are getting ready to launch the first flexible smartphones to market in the first half of 2013. The company - along with many other smartphone makers - have been researching the the technology for as long as 10 years, but it’s been difficult to bring it to market due to difficulties mass producing the technology. Pictured above are prototype devices which Samsung exhibited last year, although it’s not clear exactly what form the final product will take.
The flexible displays will use OLEDs, which can be put on flexible material such as plastic or metal foil.

"The key reason for Samsung to use plastic rather than conventional glass is to produce displays that aren’t breakable. The technology could also help lower manufacturing costs and help differentiate its products from other rivals," said Lee Seung-chul, an analyst at Shinyoung Securities.

First flexible smartphones to launch in 2013.

According to a report by the Wall Street Journal, Samsung are getting ready to launch the first flexible smartphones to market in the first half of 2013. The company - along with many other smartphone makers - have been researching the the technology for as long as 10 years, but it’s been difficult to bring it to market due to difficulties mass producing the technology. Pictured above are prototype devices which Samsung exhibited last year, although it’s not clear exactly what form the final product will take.

The flexible displays will use OLEDs, which can be put on flexible material such as plastic or metal foil.

"The key reason for Samsung to use plastic rather than conventional glass is to produce displays that aren’t breakable. The technology could also help lower manufacturing costs and help differentiate its products from other rivals," said Lee Seung-chul, an analyst at Shinyoung Securities.

5G research centre funded.
A research centre is to be set up at the University of Surrey to research 5th generation mobile technology. The centre has received £35 million in funding from mobile industry companies such as Huawei, Samsung, and Fujitsu, as well as the UK government.

The global telecommunications industry, valued at $2.1 trillion per annum, is already responsible for 6% of world GDP.  Mobile communications data traffic is expected to increase 1,000 fold by 2020, by which time there will be an estimated at least 50 billion Internet-capable devices.
The growth in the number of new applications running on the networks is accelerating, as ever more mobile devices become the preferred route for Internet access. Such unprecedented data traffic growth requires the urgent introduction of new 5G advanced technologies that maximise the use of the limited available radio spectrum and provide for Greener technologies and solutions.

5G research centre funded.

A research centre is to be set up at the University of Surrey to research 5th generation mobile technology. The centre has received £35 million in funding from mobile industry companies such as Huawei, Samsung, and Fujitsu, as well as the UK government.

The global telecommunications industry, valued at $2.1 trillion per annum, is already responsible for 6% of world GDP.  Mobile communications data traffic is expected to increase 1,000 fold by 2020, by which time there will be an estimated at least 50 billion Internet-capable devices.

The growth in the number of new applications running on the networks is accelerating, as ever more mobile devices become the preferred route for Internet access. Such unprecedented data traffic growth requires the urgent introduction of new 5G advanced technologies that maximise the use of the limited available radio spectrum and provide for Greener technologies and solutions.

New Samsung Galaxy unveiled tomorrow.
It seems phone designs aren’t the only thing Samsung is trying to copy from Apple, with the launch of the long rumoured Galaxy S3 (or whatever it gets called) causing excitement in the tech world, much like an iPhone launch.
Keep an eye out on their website for more news on the official announcement, in less than 24 hours from now.

New Samsung Galaxy unveiled tomorrow.

It seems phone designs aren’t the only thing Samsung is trying to copy from Apple, with the launch of the long rumoured Galaxy S3 (or whatever it gets called) causing excitement in the tech world, much like an iPhone launch.

Keep an eye out on their website for more news on the official announcement, in less than 24 hours from now.

Video: Radio Shack’s “Complete transportable cellular phone system” from 1989.

Samsung announces projector phone.
Samsung has shown off the Galaxy Beam smartphone at the Mobile World Congress, capable of projecting images up to 50 inches wide on any surface. The phone runs Android and measures 12.5mm thick and 4 inches wide. Pity it’s a couple of months too late, I had been predicting more devices like this to be released in 2011!

Meanwhile the first of the quad-core smartphones have been shown off. Huawei announced the Ascend D Quad range, which surprisingly didn’t feature the expected Tegra 3 chip from Nvidia. Instead the line features a new Huawei chip called the K3C2, and has a huge 4.5 inch, 720p screen.

Samsung announces projector phone.

Samsung has shown off the Galaxy Beam smartphone at the Mobile World Congress, capable of projecting images up to 50 inches wide on any surface. The phone runs Android and measures 12.5mm thick and 4 inches wide. Pity it’s a couple of months too late, I had been predicting more devices like this to be released in 2011!

Meanwhile the first of the quad-core smartphones have been shown off. Huawei announced the Ascend D Quad range, which surprisingly didn’t feature the expected Tegra 3 chip from Nvidia. Instead the line features a new Huawei chip called the K3C2, and has a huge 4.5 inch, 720p screen.

iPhone sales outpace births.
Apple sold 37 million iPhones in the December quarter, at an average rate of 4.6 per second. The current global birth rate is 4.2 per second.

While the United Nations predicts the birth rate will soon climb to five births a second - as the global population surpasses 7 billion - the rate of smartphones sales is likely to grow even faster.

I’d love to know the international death rate vs the rate of broken iPhones. Or how many babies are responsible for broken phones, I know my kid likes to throw technology in the toilet - RIP Nintendo DS :(
A report earlier this week also shows that the number of mobile-connected devices will exceed the number of people on earth by the end of this year - read about that here.

iPhone sales outpace births.

Apple sold 37 million iPhones in the December quarter, at an average rate of 4.6 per second. The current global birth rate is 4.2 per second.

While the United Nations predicts the birth rate will soon climb to five births a second - as the global population surpasses 7 billion - the rate of smartphones sales is likely to grow even faster.

I’d love to know the international death rate vs the rate of broken iPhones. Or how many babies are responsible for broken phones, I know my kid likes to throw technology in the toilet - RIP Nintendo DS :(

A report earlier this week also shows that the number of mobile-connected devices will exceed the number of people on earth by the end of this year - read about that here.

Report predicts more smartphones than humans in 2012.
The Cisco VNI aims to “track and forecast the impact of visual networking applications on global networks” which is a fancy way of saying that they want to know where the internets are headed, given that they make US$40 billion a year selling the hardware that ties it all together. The report focuses on mobile data, eg from smartphones, tablets and other portable devices.
The graph above shows that by 2016 mobile data traffic is expected to grow 18 times from the present average of 0.6 Exabytes per month, to 10.8 EB per month in 2016. The 29 page document also stated:
Last year’s mobile data traffic was eight times the size of the entire global Internet in 2000.
Mobile video traffic exceeded 50 percent for the first time in 2011 - 52% of all mobile data was for video.
In 2011, a fourth-generation (4G) connection generated 28 times more traffic on average than a non-4G connection. Although 4G connections represent only 0.2 percent of mobile connections today, they already account for 6 percent of mobile data traffic. 
Android is now higher than iPhone levels of data use.
By the end of 2012, the number of mobile-connected devices will exceed the number of people on earth, and by 2016 there will be 1.4 mobile devices per capita.

Report predicts more smartphones than humans in 2012.

The Cisco VNI aims to “track and forecast the impact of visual networking applications on global networks” which is a fancy way of saying that they want to know where the internets are headed, given that they make US$40 billion a year selling the hardware that ties it all together. The report focuses on mobile data, eg from smartphones, tablets and other portable devices.

The graph above shows that by 2016 mobile data traffic is expected to grow 18 times from the present average of 0.6 Exabytes per month, to 10.8 EB per month in 2016. The 29 page document also stated:

  • Last year’s mobile data traffic was eight times the size of the entire global Internet in 2000.
  • Mobile video traffic exceeded 50 percent for the first time in 2011 - 52% of all mobile data was for video.
  • In 2011, a fourth-generation (4G) connection generated 28 times more traffic on average than a non-4G connection. Although 4G connections represent only 0.2 percent of mobile connections today, they already account for 6 percent of mobile data traffic. 
  • Android is now higher than iPhone levels of data use.
  • By the end of 2012, the number of mobile-connected devices will exceed the number of people on earth, and by 2016 there will be 1.4 mobile devices per capita.
Android Market to finally scan for malware.
One of the main criticisms of the open source Android software has long been the amount of malware, including this round of security flaws which last month affected up to five million users.
Now, Google has revealed a new scanning system for the Android Market, codenamed Bouncer.

Here’s how it works: once an application is uploaded, the service immediately starts analyzing it for known malware, spyware and trojans. It also looks for behaviors that indicate an application might be misbehaving, and compares it against previously analyzed apps to detect possible red flags. We actually run every application on Google’s cloud infrastructure and simulate how it will run on an Android device to look for hidden, malicious behavior. We also analyze new developer accounts to help prevent malicious and repeat-offending developers from coming back. 

The Google Mobile Blog goes on to say that the service has been looking for malicious apps in Market for a while now, and between the first and second halves of 2011, they saw a 40% decrease in the number of potentially-malicious downloads from Android Market.

Android Market to finally scan for malware.

One of the main criticisms of the open source Android software has long been the amount of malware, including this round of security flaws which last month affected up to five million users.

Now, Google has revealed a new scanning system for the Android Market, codenamed Bouncer.

Here’s how it works: once an application is uploaded, the service immediately starts analyzing it for known malware, spyware and trojans. It also looks for behaviors that indicate an application might be misbehaving, and compares it against previously analyzed apps to detect possible red flags. We actually run every application on Google’s cloud infrastructure and simulate how it will run on an Android device to look for hidden, malicious behavior. We also analyze new developer accounts to help prevent malicious and repeat-offending developers from coming back.

The Google Mobile Blog goes on to say that the service has been looking for malicious apps in Market for a while now, and between the first and second halves of 2011, they saw a 40% decrease in the number of potentially-malicious downloads from Android Market.