Posts tagged electronics

New LG TV rolls up like a poster.
This is an 18 inch flexible display from LG, with a 12,00 x 800 pixel resolution. The company expects a 60 inch 4K TV to be possible using this type of technology by 2017.
Not only does this screen look super cool, but it would drastically reduce shipping and storage costs if future TV’s were able to be sent rolled up in a small tube.
More tech stories at 8 Bit Future.

New LG TV rolls up like a poster.

This is an 18 inch flexible display from LG, with a 12,00 x 800 pixel resolution. The company expects a 60 inch 4K TV to be possible using this type of technology by 2017.

Not only does this screen look super cool, but it would drastically reduce shipping and storage costs if future TV’s were able to be sent rolled up in a small tube.

Video: The Fujitsu lettuce factory.

After several years of shutting down production lines in chip fabrication facilities, the Japanese electronics giant is turning its sterile, dust free factory into a hydroponic lettuce farm.

edit: Have updated the video to a working link, it’s in Japanese now but you can still catch an English version here.

Printable, foldable electronics demonstrated.
A Northwestern University team has developed a graphene based ink that is highly conductive and tolerant to bending, with the ink’s conductivity remaining virtually unchanged even when folded.
The team has demonstrated how the ink can be used in inkjet printers to allow for low cost printable electronics, which could also be scaled up to larger sizes reasonably easily.

Inkjet printing has previously been explored as a method for fabricating transistors, solar cells, and other electronic components. It is inexpensive, capable of printing large areas, and can create patterns on a variety of substrates, making it an attractive option for next-generation electronics.

Printable, foldable electronics demonstrated.

A Northwestern University team has developed a graphene based ink that is highly conductive and tolerant to bending, with the ink’s conductivity remaining virtually unchanged even when folded.

The team has demonstrated how the ink can be used in inkjet printers to allow for low cost printable electronics, which could also be scaled up to larger sizes reasonably easily.

Inkjet printing has previously been explored as a method for fabricating transistors, solar cells, and other electronic components. It is inexpensive, capable of printing large areas, and can create patterns on a variety of substrates, making it an attractive option for next-generation electronics.

"Bare Paint" pen lets you create a circuit on paper.
The makers of Bare Paint claim their product is the world’s first non-toxic, electrically conductive paint available, making it a perfect tool for educational projects such as touch-sensitive paper drawings that can create sounds or turn on LED lights.

"We generally split applications into two simple classifications, signaling and powering," they said. "Signaling could include using the Paint as a potentiometer while interfacing with a micro-controller, as a conduit in a larger circuit or as a capacitive sensor. Powering a device would include lighting LED’s or driving small speakers. The most interesting stuff happens when you combine these properties into something new."

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"Bare Paint" pen lets you create a circuit on paper.

The makers of Bare Paint claim their product is the world’s first non-toxic, electrically conductive paint available, making it a perfect tool for educational projects such as touch-sensitive paper drawings that can create sounds or turn on LED lights.

"We generally split applications into two simple classifications, signaling and powering," they said. "Signaling could include using the Paint as a potentiometer while interfacing with a micro-controller, as a conduit in a larger circuit or as a capacitive sensor. Powering a device would include lighting LED’s or driving small speakers. The most interesting stuff happens when you combine these properties into something new."

"Perfect" single-atom transistor created.

Researchers at an Australian University have created a working transistor out of a single atom of phosphorus, placed on a silicon crystal. The microscopic device even has tiny visible markers etched onto its surface so researchers can connect metal contacts and apply a voltage.

The result - published here - is a huge step towards future quantum computers able to process complex equations which are so far beyond the reach of even the fastest supercomputers. The research will also enable the continuation of ever smaller transistors in accordance with (or even exceeding) Moores Law, which would mean that all transistors reach single-atom level by 2020.

Startup hopes to extend the range of wireless charging.
Current generation ‘wireless’ charging (induction charging) rely on objects being placed very close together to allow charging, like this Powermat. Now startup company Witricity hopes to extend that range, and is hoping to have its first products on the market this year.
Rather than use potentially harmful laser or microwave transmission, Witricity still uses the traditional magnetic coil system as used in devices with shorter range, but by making larger coils they have been able to send power over distances of about a meter.
The company currently has a contract with Toyota to charge electric vehicles (pictured), and has a partnership with a Taiwanese electronics company to bring the technology to portable electronics. They have also developed a wireless keyboard and mouse that can be powered from a computer monitor, eliminating the need for batteries.

Startup hopes to extend the range of wireless charging.

Current generation ‘wireless’ charging (induction charging) rely on objects being placed very close together to allow charging, like this Powermat. Now startup company Witricity hopes to extend that range, and is hoping to have its first products on the market this year.

Rather than use potentially harmful laser or microwave transmission, Witricity still uses the traditional magnetic coil system as used in devices with shorter range, but by making larger coils they have been able to send power over distances of about a meter.

The company currently has a contract with Toyota to charge electric vehicles (pictured), and has a partnership with a Taiwanese electronics company to bring the technology to portable electronics. They have also developed a wireless keyboard and mouse that can be powered from a computer monitor, eliminating the need for batteries.

Self-healing electronics demonstrated.
A University of Illinois team has found a way to make electronic circuits that are able to repair themselves in the event of a failure.
Microchips or small wires in circuits can be prone to overheating or breaking due to fatigue, and are normally replaced when needed. In military or space transport applications however, replacement is not always an option.

The Illinois team previously developed a system for self-healing polymer materials and decided to adapt their technique for conductive systems. They dispersed tiny microcapsules, as small as 10 microns (millionths of a meter) in diameter, on top of a gold line functioning as a circuit. As a crack propagates, the microcapsules break open and release the liquid metal contained inside. The liquid metal fills in the gap in the circuit, restoring electrical flow.

The team plans to next apply the system to use the microcapsules to build longer lasting, safer batteries.

Self-healing electronics demonstrated.

A University of Illinois team has found a way to make electronic circuits that are able to repair themselves in the event of a failure.

Microchips or small wires in circuits can be prone to overheating or breaking due to fatigue, and are normally replaced when needed. In military or space transport applications however, replacement is not always an option.

The Illinois team previously developed a system for self-healing polymer materials and decided to adapt their technique for conductive systems. They dispersed tiny microcapsules, as small as 10 microns (millionths of a meter) in diameter, on top of a gold line functioning as a circuit. As a crack propagates, the microcapsules break open and release the liquid metal contained inside. The liquid metal fills in the gap in the circuit, restoring electrical flow.

The team plans to next apply the system to use the microcapsules to build longer lasting, safer batteries.

CES 2012 about to begin.
The Consumer Electronics Show 2012 is about to begin in Las Vegas, running January 10 - 13. Last years show attracted over 128,000 people, and introduced such gadgets as the Motorola Xoom tables, Android 3.0, Intel Sandy Bridge and AMD Fusion CPUs, along with many new 3D TVs and 3D gadgets such as the LG Optimus 3D.
This year an initial highlight looks like being a new Lenovo TV featuring Android 4.0, or Ice Cream sandwich. The next generation Intel chip will also feature prominently in many new ultrabooks, which are likely to be released in the second half of this year. This will also be the last year that Microsoft attends the event.

CES 2012 about to begin.

The Consumer Electronics Show 2012 is about to begin in Las Vegas, running January 10 - 13. Last years show attracted over 128,000 people, and introduced such gadgets as the Motorola Xoom tables, Android 3.0, Intel Sandy Bridge and AMD Fusion CPUs, along with many new 3D TVs and 3D gadgets such as the LG Optimus 3D.

This year an initial highlight looks like being a new Lenovo TV featuring Android 4.0, or Ice Cream sandwich. The next generation Intel chip will also feature prominently in many new ultrabooks, which are likely to be released in the second half of this year. This will also be the last year that Microsoft attends the event.

Ink ‘writes’ electronic circuits.
University of Illinois engineers have developed a pen which uses conductive silver ink to write electronic circuits on paper or similar surfaces. One dry, the circuits are then able to be bent and folded, maintaining their structure.

The normal-looking pen’s ink is a solution of silver. After writing, the ink dries to leave conducting pathways that maintain their integrity through multiple bends and folds in the paper, enabling devices with flexibility and conformability. The breakthrough leads a new class of flexible, low-cost and disposable electronics, according to the team.

Ink ‘writes’ electronic circuits.

University of Illinois engineers have developed a pen which uses conductive silver ink to write electronic circuits on paper or similar surfaces. One dry, the circuits are then able to be bent and folded, maintaining their structure.

The normal-looking pen’s ink is a solution of silver. After writing, the ink dries to leave conducting pathways that maintain their integrity through multiple bends and folds in the paper, enabling devices with flexibility and conformability. The breakthrough leads a new class of flexible, low-cost and disposable electronics, according to the team.

MSN

Man volunteers to have hand amputated, goes bionic instead.
The Austrian patient lost the use of his right hand in a motorcycle accident ten years ago. Now he’s chosen to have the hand amputated completely.
When the stump heals in a few weeks time he will be fitted with an electronic prosthesis, capable of being controlled only by nerve signals from his brain. This is possible as although the hand was damaged, the electronic signals are still able to travel from his brain to his hand.
Last year a 24 year old man was the first to have the bionic hand fitted, also by the same medical team in Austria. "I can do functions which I did with my normal hand with the prosthetic arm," he said, recalling his response to first being fitted with a bionic hand. Multiple signals can be read simultaneously, enabling the patient to twist and flex their wrist back and forward, again using the same brain signals that would have powered similar movement in the real hand.
That patient is already testing a second generation of bionic hand, capable of giving him much greater movement. The new hand has six sensors fitted over nerves within the lower arm, rather than the two on his current prosthesis.

Man volunteers to have hand amputated, goes bionic instead.

The Austrian patient lost the use of his right hand in a motorcycle accident ten years ago. Now he’s chosen to have the hand amputated completely.

When the stump heals in a few weeks time he will be fitted with an electronic prosthesis, capable of being controlled only by nerve signals from his brain. This is possible as although the hand was damaged, the electronic signals are still able to travel from his brain to his hand.

Last year a 24 year old man was the first to have the bionic hand fitted, also by the same medical team in Austria. "I can do functions which I did with my normal hand with the prosthetic arm," he said, recalling his response to first being fitted with a bionic hand. Multiple signals can be read simultaneously, enabling the patient to twist and flex their wrist back and forward, again using the same brain signals that would have powered similar movement in the real hand.

That patient is already testing a second generation of bionic hand, capable of giving him much greater movement. The new hand has six sensors fitted over nerves within the lower arm, rather than the two on his current prosthesis.

BBC