Posts tagged Augmented reality

Video: Land Rover’s new ‘transparent bonnet’ feature.

Cameras located in the vehicle’s grille capture data used to feed a Head-Up Display, effectively creating a ‘see-through’ view of the terrain through the bonnet and engine bay, breaking new ground in visual driver assistance. The technology, named Transparent Bonnet by its creators, shows how advanced technology will take Land Rover’s unrivalled capability to the next level. 

The technology enables a driver climbing a steep incline or manoeuvring in a confined space to see an augmented reality view capturing not only the terrain in front of the car but also the angle and position of the front wheels.

i-Air Touch glasses allow for a virtual touchscreen

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A new product from a Taiwanese company combines a see-through display with ‘air-touch input’, to allow users to navigate functions of the glasses using a virtual touchscreen.

Video: castAR Kickstarter demonstration.

castAR is a projected augmented reality system that displays holographic-like 3D projections right in front of you. Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope sparked our imaginations of what might be possible in the future by showing R2-D2 and Chewbacca playing a holographic 3D chess-style game. It has taken nearly 35 years since the film was released for this technological dream to come to reality, but with castAR, that reality can be yours.

castAR includes a very fast and highly precise tracking solution, allowing you to change your experience by holding your 3D world in place while you are free to move around in it.

With three weeks left in their campaign, there’s still time to get your own - packages start at US$189.

Could Dekko be the killer app for Google Glass?

Dekko claims to turn the real world into an operating system, bringing images, information, and animations into the world using augmented reality through Google Glass.

It’s hard to explain exactly, so check out the video!

Video: iOptik contact lens display.

More info on Innovega’s wearable augmented reality display system, being shown at CES this week. Their contact lenses allow the eye to focus on the contact lens itself (normally you can’t focus on something that close), and a pair of glasses projects images or media on to the contact lens display.

NASA’s Augmented reality ‘Spacecraft 3D’ app available now.
The free app lets you use the camera on your iPhone or iPad to show a NASA rover rolling around ‘in the real world’. The current range of rovers available includes Curiosity - which is due to land on Mars in just over two weeks. The range of rovers will be expanded with future updates.
Check out the app here at the iTunes store.

NASA’s Augmented reality ‘Spacecraft 3D’ app available now.

The free app lets you use the camera on your iPhone or iPad to show a NASA rover rolling around ‘in the real world’. The current range of rovers available includes Curiosity - which is due to land on Mars in just over two weeks. The range of rovers will be expanded with future updates.

Check out the app here at the iTunes store.

I’ve been enjoying this augmented reality driving app I came across a few days ago, called iOnRoad. The website describes it best:

iOnRoad improves driving in real-time using the power of advanced smartphones. The app uses the smartphone’s native camera and sensors to detect vehicles in front of the vehicle, alerting drivers when they are in danger. iOnRoad’s VisualRadar, maps objects in front of the driver in real time, calculating the user’s current speed using native sensors. As the vehicle approaches danger, an audio-visual warning pops up to warn the driver of a possible collision, allowing them to brake in time.

It’s great to see an augmented reality app which finally works well and is useful, after finding disappointing results with Layar which should be useful but just doesn’t seem to work well or have enough information to make it worthwhile. The only downside with the system is the worry that when the phone beeps to alert you of an upcoming collision, you turn to look at the phone instead of looking at the road!
If you’re on Android you can check out the free download here, with iPhone users having to wait for their version a while longer as the iPhone 4S is missing the “advanced power and multi-tasking capabilities of high-end Android handsets”, according to the company. Take that Apple fanboys!

I’ve been enjoying this augmented reality driving app I came across a few days ago, called iOnRoad. The website describes it best:

iOnRoad improves driving in real-time using the power of advanced smartphones. The app uses the smartphone’s native camera and sensors to detect vehicles in front of the vehicle, alerting drivers when they are in danger. iOnRoad’s VisualRadar, maps objects in front of the driver in real time, calculating the user’s current speed using native sensors. As the vehicle approaches danger, an audio-visual warning pops up to warn the driver of a possible collision, allowing them to brake in time.

It’s great to see an augmented reality app which finally works well and is useful, after finding disappointing results with Layar which should be useful but just doesn’t seem to work well or have enough information to make it worthwhile. The only downside with the system is the worry that when the phone beeps to alert you of an upcoming collision, you turn to look at the phone instead of looking at the road!

If you’re on Android you can check out the free download here, with iPhone users having to wait for their version a while longer as the iPhone 4S is missing the “advanced power and multi-tasking capabilities of high-end Android handsets”, according to the company. Take that Apple fanboys!

XAPPR gun turns your smartphone into a… gun?
I’m not sure if this will be exciting or not, but it sure makes me want to play laser tag.
The ZAPPR is said to be a “gaming peripheral for smartphones”. The device allows you to play augmented reality shooting games, such as AR Invaders. Of course you don’t need the gun to play that game, but it does look kind of cool.
While most handsets should fit the device, games are only available for Android and iOS at this stage. The ZAPPR costs $30 plus shipping - you can pre-order now for a June release.

XAPPR gun turns your smartphone into a… gun?

I’m not sure if this will be exciting or not, but it sure makes me want to play laser tag.

The ZAPPR is said to be a “gaming peripheral for smartphones”. The device allows you to play augmented reality shooting games, such as AR Invaders. Of course you don’t need the gun to play that game, but it does look kind of cool.

While most handsets should fit the device, games are only available for Android and iOS at this stage. The ZAPPR costs $30 plus shipping - you can pre-order now for a June release.

Innovega to release contact lens displays.
Innovega Inc has developed contact lenses capable of presenting high resolution images for entertainment or augmented reality applications.
“Conventional mobile device screens are too small to read and certainly too small to enjoy. Over the past months we have demonstrated contact lens enabled eyewear for mobile devices including smartphones, portable game devices and media players that deliver panoramic, high-resolution experiences for entertainment and planned Augmented Reality (AR)* applications”, said Steve Willey, Innovega CEO. “During this same period, we collaborated with partners to finalize initial specifications of launch platforms which include a screen size that is equivalent to a 240 inch television (viewed at a usual distance of 10 feet)”.
The lens uses ‘micro components’ which are so small that, when switched off, the user is able to focus normally on everyday objects. When switched on, it allows light from the display to pass through the center of the pupil, and light from the surrounding environment to pass through the outer portion of the pupil. Each of these sets of light rays produces an image on the retina simultaneously with the other set. They are superimposed to form a single integrated image.
While a consumer release of the product is likely 2-3 years away, the company is also working with DARPA for a military version of the device.

Innovega to release contact lens displays.

Innovega Inc has developed contact lenses capable of presenting high resolution images for entertainment or augmented reality applications.

“Conventional mobile device screens are too small to read and certainly too small to enjoy. Over the past months we have demonstrated contact lens enabled eyewear for mobile devices including smartphones, portable game devices and media players that deliver panoramic, high-resolution experiences for entertainment and planned Augmented Reality (AR)* applications”, said Steve Willey, Innovega CEO. “During this same period, we collaborated with partners to finalize initial specifications of launch platforms which include a screen size that is equivalent to a 240 inch television (viewed at a usual distance of 10 feet)”.

The lens uses ‘micro components’ which are so small that, when switched off, the user is able to focus normally on everyday objects. When switched on, it allows light from the display to pass through the center of the pupil, and light from the surrounding environment to pass through the outer portion of the pupil. Each of these sets of light rays produces an image on the retina simultaneously with the other set. They are superimposed to form a single integrated image.

While a consumer release of the product is likely 2-3 years away, the company is also working with DARPA for a military version of the device.

Video of the day: Second generation augmented reality from Sony.

This video shows the progress Sony is making in bringing augmented reality to its devices. Normally, AR requires a special marker to recognise before generating a graphic around it, but the new technology scans for everyday objects such as a cup or a book to start the process.

There’s some moderately interesting stuff after the first minute, but for the best bits, skip straight to 2:37.