This super slippery plate cleans itself.
This plate and bowl are made from nanocellulose, which is lightweight, malleable, and able to withstand drops. And best of all, it’s superhydrophobic, meaning once you’re done eating you just turn it upside down over a sink and every last drop falls clean off the surface, leaving it clean for the next use.

Glansén says that the the self-cleaning plate and bowl is not only safe, but has been shown to work exactly as advertised, on both water and oil-based foods. To clean it, she says, just turn it sideways or upside down over a sink. “There are products on the market that are superhydrophobic coatings, but they cannot be used in connection to food, and they are made from other chemicals,” she says. “This new technique is based on natural substances.”
Though it’s still only a concept, she says that the technology is meant to be a long-term solution, as it’s being researched and developed for products with a “long life-span.” For now, the designers’ client, Innventia, holds the rights to the project and is exploring its feasibility in the consumer marketplace.

This super slippery plate cleans itself.

This plate and bowl are made from nanocellulose, which is lightweight, malleable, and able to withstand drops. And best of all, it’s superhydrophobic, meaning once you’re done eating you just turn it upside down over a sink and every last drop falls clean off the surface, leaving it clean for the next use.

Glansén says that the the self-cleaning plate and bowl is not only safe, but has been shown to work exactly as advertised, on both water and oil-based foods. To clean it, she says, just turn it sideways or upside down over a sink. “There are products on the market that are superhydrophobic coatings, but they cannot be used in connection to food, and they are made from other chemicals,” she says. “This new technique is based on natural substances.”

Though it’s still only a concept, she says that the technology is meant to be a long-term solution, as it’s being researched and developed for products with a “long life-span.” For now, the designers’ client, Innventia, holds the rights to the project and is exploring its feasibility in the consumer marketplace.

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