Little Big Planet, reimagined as a 16 bit classic.
I’d go there and I haven’t even played the (modern) original.
What other new games do you think would work well as a retro console version?

Little Big Planet, reimagined as a 16 bit classic.

I’d go there and I haven’t even played the (modern) original.

What other new games do you think would work well as a retro console version?

Rocketskates blast through Kickstarter goal.
Finally, the future has caught up with your feet.
Rocketskates are electric, motorized skates that strap on over your normal shoes. Each skate has two hub motors controlled by an on-board microprocessor, and are powered by a lithium-ion battery pack. The skates communicate with each other so they maintain the same speed and behavior. 
Instead of relying on a remote control, the skates rely on the rider leaning back or forwards on the ‘lead skate’ to control speed, sort of like Segways for your feet. For safety, the skates don’t start until you push off and start rolling.
Wearers are still able to walk short distances while wearing the skates to climb stairs or cross gutters or get around puddles - while the skates can handle a splash of water, they’re not officially water proof.
The skates also connect to a smartphone to allow route tracking, skate diagnosis, battery status, games, and social interactivity, with the app showing other Rocketskaters if they appear on your local map. The lead skate can also be controlled via the smartphone app.
The Kickstarter campaign raised enough funds with a couple of days to allow the company to place an order with the factory, and expects to start shipping in October this year.
Get in here to get your own - it looks certain that both stretch goals will be reached meaning free backpacks and helmets for all backers.

Rocketskates blast through Kickstarter goal.

Finally, the future has caught up with your feet.

Rocketskates are electric, motorized skates that strap on over your normal shoes. Each skate has two hub motors controlled by an on-board microprocessor, and are powered by a lithium-ion battery pack. The skates communicate with each other so they maintain the same speed and behavior. 

Instead of relying on a remote control, the skates rely on the rider leaning back or forwards on the ‘lead skate’ to control speed, sort of like Segways for your feet. For safety, the skates don’t start until you push off and start rolling.

Wearers are still able to walk short distances while wearing the skates to climb stairs or cross gutters or get around puddles - while the skates can handle a splash of water, they’re not officially water proof.

The skates also connect to a smartphone to allow route tracking, skate diagnosis, battery status, games, and social interactivity, with the app showing other Rocketskaters if they appear on your local map. The lead skate can also be controlled via the smartphone app.

The Kickstarter campaign raised enough funds with a couple of days to allow the company to place an order with the factory, and expects to start shipping in October this year.

Get in here to get your own - it looks certain that both stretch goals will be reached meaning free backpacks and helmets for all backers.

This is a concept drawing of a ‘World View’ space capsule, which could be taking paying passengers to a 100,000 foot altitude for several hour trips, starting in as little as four years.
The capsule is hoisted by a giant balloon, and carries six passengers and two crew.
More space stories at 8 Bit Future.

This is a concept drawing of a ‘World View’ space capsule, which could be taking paying passengers to a 100,000 foot altitude for several hour trips, starting in as little as four years.

The capsule is hoisted by a giant balloon, and carries six passengers and two crew.

The world’s first arcade machine.
More photos over at Engadget.
More retro gaming pics at 8 Bit Future.

The world’s first arcade machine.

More photos over at Engadget.

More retro gaming pics at 8 Bit Future.

Prototype Robot With Smartphone to Test 3-D Mapping, Navigation Inside Space Station
The next launch to the International Space Station will carry this prototype free-flying space robot equipped with a smartphone, known as Smart SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient Experimental Satellites).
NASA has been testing SPHERES on the space station since 2011. This summer, astronauts will upgrade these existing space robots to use Google’s “Project Tango” smartphone, which features a custom 3-D sensor and multiple cameras. NASA will then use the Smart SPHERES to test free-flying 3-D mapping and navigation inside the space station. NASA is developing the Smart SPHERES to perform work on the space station that requires mobile sensing, such as environmental surveys to monitor levels of radiation, lighting and air quality. They also will be used to monitor inventory and conduct experiments. The development and testing of Smart SPHERES is funded by the Space Technology Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

More space stories on 8 Bit Future
More tech stories on 8 Bit Future

Prototype Robot With Smartphone to Test 3-D Mapping, Navigation Inside Space Station

The next launch to the International Space Station will carry this prototype free-flying space robot equipped with a smartphone, known as Smart SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient Experimental Satellites).

NASA has been testing SPHERES on the space station since 2011. This summer, astronauts will upgrade these existing space robots to use Google’s “Project Tango” smartphone, which features a custom 3-D sensor and multiple cameras. NASA will then use the Smart SPHERES to test free-flying 3-D mapping and navigation inside the space station. NASA is developing the Smart SPHERES to perform work on the space station that requires mobile sensing, such as environmental surveys to monitor levels of radiation, lighting and air quality. They also will be used to monitor inventory and conduct experiments. The development and testing of Smart SPHERES is funded by the Space Technology Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

Video: Bio-Bots.

University of Illinois researchers have created robots that move using living muscle tissue.

Video: The Fujitsu lettuce factory.

After several years of shutting down production lines in chip fabrication facilities, the Japanese electronics giant is turning its sterile, dust free factory into a hydroponic lettuce farm.

edit: Have updated the video to a working link, it’s in Japanese now but you can still catch an English version here.

Photo: Stars from the ISS.
This is a composite of a series of images photographed from a mounted camera on the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, from approximately 240 miles above Earth. Space station hardware in the foreground includes the Mini-Research Module (MRM1, center) and a Russian Progress vehicle docked to the Pirs Docking Compartment (right). Expedition 31 Flight Engineer Don Pettit relayed some information about photographic techniques used to achieve the images: “My star trail images are made by taking a time exposure of about 10 to 15 minutes. However, with modern digital cameras, 30 seconds is about the longest exposure possible, due to electronic detector noise effectively snowing out the image. To achieve the longer exposures I do what many amateur astronomers do. I take multiple 30-second exposures, then ‘stack’ them using imaging software, thus producing the longer exposure.” A total of 47 images photographed by the astronaut-monitored stationary camera were combined to create this composite.

Photo: Stars from the ISS.

This is a composite of a series of images photographed from a mounted camera on the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, from approximately 240 miles above Earth. Space station hardware in the foreground includes the Mini-Research Module (MRM1, center) and a Russian Progress vehicle docked to the Pirs Docking Compartment (right). Expedition 31 Flight Engineer Don Pettit relayed some information about photographic techniques used to achieve the images: “My star trail images are made by taking a time exposure of about 10 to 15 minutes. However, with modern digital cameras, 30 seconds is about the longest exposure possible, due to electronic detector noise effectively snowing out the image. To achieve the longer exposures I do what many amateur astronomers do. I take multiple 30-second exposures, then ‘stack’ them using imaging software, thus producing the longer exposure.” A total of 47 images photographed by the astronaut-monitored stationary camera were combined to create this composite.